Tag Archives: Trustees Week

TRUSTEES WEEK: VICTORIA WALDEN

This week, we are celebrating Trustees Week (4-8 November)!

We are delighted to have recently welcomed 3 new Trustees to the Cinema For All Board. We asked newly Elected Trustee, Victoria Walden, some questions about her experience so far, and what advice she would give to anyone thinking of becoming a Trustee.

Why did you decide to become a trustee of Cinema For All?
I started volunteering at Deptford Cinema – a volunteer run film and art space in South East London – in 2017. I was very quickly hooked! I thought Deptford Cinema was one of a kind, but when I was introduced to Cinema for All through the annual conference and awards ceremony, I discovered there were so many more community cinemas across the country.

I have been fortunate to work with incredibly established and first time filmmakers on collaborative projects at Deptford Cinema, and to co-lead a travelling cinema for older people in our borough. When the opportunity arose to get involved with Cinema for All, I jumped at the chance to support the role of cinema in communities at a national level.

What do you enjoy most about your role as Trustee?
I was only elected as Trustee in September at the AGM at the annual conference, so I’m still very new and looking forward to completing my induction, my first board meeting, and coming out to visit community cinemas across the UK next year. If you would welcome a visit from me, please do get in touch! I’m really excited about learning what different groups are doing.

Do you have any advice for people who want to become a Trustee?
Do it! As an elected Trustee, you will be representing the voices of community cinema. There is a lot to take in during the first few months, particularly in relation to understand charity governance and regulations. However, you can’t be expected to retain it all on the first read. Keep referring back to documents regularly and most importantly never be afraid to ask questions! Even as the newbie, I have felt incredibly welcomed by the Cinema for All staff and Trustees. There is a great induction programme and you’ll get a supportive mentor too!

TRUSTEES WEEK: JANE MEHTA

This week, we are celebrating Trustees Week (4-8 November)!

We are delighted to have recently welcomed 3 new wonderful Trustees to the Cinema For All Board. We asked Board Member, Jane Mehta, some questions about her experience so far, and what advice she would give to anyone thinking of becoming a Trustee.

Why did you decide to become a trustee of Cinema For All?

I saw the advert for the trustee role, looked at the website, liked it, listened to a podcast and was hooked. It’s a great fit with the work I do for my local cinema which I helped to found. I felt it was an opportunity to use my love of cinema and my professional skills to spread and share the excitement and joy of cinema!

What do you enjoy most about your role as Trustee?

It’s early days for me. So far I’ve really enjoyed getting to know the team and understanding more about Cinema For All and what it can offer. I really enjoyed the conference in September – the films and debates were stimulating and interesting. I’m also enjoying getting to know Sheffield and I love the train trip North!

Do you have any advice for people who want to become a Trustee?

Work with something you love to do and be really clear about what you have to offer and what the organisation will get from you – it’s a partnership.

TRUSTEES WEEK: REBECCA ELLIS

This week, we are celebrating Trustees Week (4-8 November)!

We are delighted to have recently welcomed 3 new wonderful Trustees to the Cinema For All Board. We asked co-opted Board Member, Rebecca Ellis, some questions about her experience so far, and what advice she would give to anyone thinking of becoming a Trustee.

Why did you decide to become a trustee of Cinema For All?

The importance of Film Education is so important to me, particularly in today’s context where the creative arts continue to become marginalised within the curriculum. By becoming a Trustee I hoped to add value to this already thriving organisation, by helping them develop the educational strands within their strategy. Cinema for All has been an organisation I admire for so long – to be able to help them in any way is an absolute privilege.

What do you enjoy most about your role as Trustee?

Even as a new Trustee, I have already experienced a lot of enjoyment in the role. I have met some extremely dynamic individuals and some great female role models who have already, unknowingly helped me with my confidence levels and how I approach things in my daily working life. I have enjoyed experiencing what goes on behind the scenes of an organisation and figuring out how I can bridge any gaps with my skillset. Of course the Cinema for All Annual Conference and Awards has to be a highlight of my experience so far. I very much enjoyed introducing the Little Shop of Horrors welcome screening and dissecting it further with members throughout the Conference. I was very pleased to be able to shed new light on the film as a masterpiece of cult camp cinema!

Do you have any advice for people who want to become a Trustee?

My advice would be to choose an organisation that excites you, somewhere you feel like you can add value and go for it! Personally for me, the experience has enhanced my knowledge in a range of areas about how a charitable organisation functions.

Trustees Week: Nadine Thomson

Following on from Trustee’s Week  (7-13 November) we interviewed Cinema For All Trustee, Nadine Thomson about the importance of a Board of Trustees and about some of her highlights in her role so far.

Tell us about your role as a Trustee.

Every charity has a Board of Trustees. As a Trustee, I, along with my fellow Trustees, am responsible for ensuring the proper governance of Cinema For All. In conjunction with our very talented staff, we ensure the charity stays focused on its objectives, set the strategic direction of Cinema For All and ratify major decisions. We meet formally as a Board four times a year. In addition, each Trustee is involved in working groups which focus on certain areas such as fundraising, education or industry partnerships.

Cinema For All has nine Trustees on the Board each with different skillsets and backgrounds. Many of our Board members have extensive backgrounds and experience in community cinema and film which is important when we are evaluating issues and making decisions. My background is in technology in the commercial world so I bring a different perspective to the Board. It’s important to have diversity of thought so we consider issues and opportunities from all angles. 

One of the working groups I’m involved in is Marketing and Communications. In conjunction with our Operations and Development Manager, Jaq Chell, I  produced our 2015-2016 infographic which is a snapshot of our annual report.

Why did you want to be a Trustee for Cinema For All?

I joined the Board in 2014. I was looking for a Trustee opportunity with a charity so I could give back to the community. I also wanted to gain experience of working on a Board as I plan to play a part in governing commercial organisations in years to come. I came across Cinema For All and had initial conversations with Katherine Sellar (then Chair and current Trustee) and Jaq Chell (Operations and Development Manager). I was struck by their passion for the organisation, depth of knowledge of the sector and their professionalism. I knew then that I wanted to be a part of Cinema For All.

What have you found particularly enjoyable or satisfying whilst being a Trustee at Cinema For All?

Listening to the staff updates at each Board meeting is always inspiring. The staff achieve so much on a small amount of funds. Recently we reviewed the Reaching Communities project which brings together diverse and marginalised communities through community cinema. Hearing about the difference the project has made to people’s lives was heart-warming.

The annual conference which brings together community cinemas and film societies from all over the country is a fantastic event. The awards ceremony recognises achievements of community cinemas and the panels allow different community cinema groups to share both their mistakes and successes with others. 

Why is it important for someone like you to be a Trustee?

It’s important to give back to the community and share your skills and experience. A strong, organised Board will give a charity a much greater chance of success and long term existence. I’m proud to support Cinema For All as it works to broaden access to diverse cinema to diverse communities. I’ve learnt a lot about film and community cinema and met inspiring and talented people through my involvement in the organisation.

Trustees Week: Gemma Bird

To celebrate Trustees Week (7-13 November) we interviewed Cinema For All’s Vice Chair, Gemma Bird about her role as a Trustee and what inspired her to become one.

Tell us about your role as a Trustee.

I became a trustee in March 2014 after volunteering for Cinema For All in the past and coming to learn how important I felt the organisation was to supporting and growing the community cinema movement. This is something I felt I really wanted to be a part of and I felt I had skills and experience that would be helpful to the organisation. I first got involved in film societies and community cinema whilst completing my PhD and joining the University of Sheffield student cinema Film Unit. During my time at Film Unit I came to understand how important film societies could be, not only in bringing communities together through the enjoyment of film but also for fundraising, raising awareness of issues and teaching children and youth groups key skills through getting to run their own cinema for a day.

Since joining the board of Cinema For All I have had two roles: I took on the role of acting Treasurer whilst we looked for a replacement which was a really helpful (and steep) learning curve for better understanding charity finance and governance, before becoming Vice Chair in 2015. As part of my role I get involved in strategy (I lead on the Board’s Education and Culture Working Group feeding into discussions with the staff about how to meet this key charitable objective), I also try to support the staff team as much as possible when needed as well as supporting the Chair. I also get to be involved in the yearly Community Cinema Conference and Film Society of the Year awards which is always a privilege. 

Why did you want to be a Trustee for Cinema For All?

I wanted to be a trustee because I think the work of the organisation is so important. I wanted to be able to help and support this work in some small way, especially as we are focusing more and more on the All in our name really meaning All. Beyond believing in the important work of the organisation, I also really enjoy community cinema and I want to continue to be a part of and support the movement and I felt this was the right way for me to do this at this time. 

What have you found particularly enjoyable or satisfying whilst being a Trustee at Cinema For All?

The opportunity to work with and support our fantastic staff team is always an honor, as is working with the rest of the board. What I find particularly special though is the opportunity to hear about all the fantastic volunteers giving up their time to be a part of the community cinema and film society movement; to learn about their events and stories, and to be inspired by all the amazing things they achieve. Thus, my most enjoyable moments are probably at the Film Society of the Year Awards and Community Cinema Conference, when every year I can learn more about the fantastic things people are achieving and to be truly humbled and inspired by them. 

Why is it important for someone like you to be a Trustee?

It is important to make the most of the skill set you have and to use it help and develop charitable organisations. You won’t always have the answer, and you will always be learning from the amazing team around you, but the arts and voluntary sectors are a vital part of our wider society. If you can help in any small way to make sure they continue to flourish it is important to do so. Beyond that, I think it is important for younger people to join boards, in particular younger women who have been under represented in the past. The different types of knowledge, experience and understanding you bring to a situation may not have been built up over the same length of time but is still important because the more  perspectives you have on a board, the better prepared you will be and hopefully the more representative.