Tag Archives: Grow Your Own Cinema

Moving Image Archive Report – Grow Your Own Cinema

Morvern Cunningham, our Grow Your Own Cinema Project Officer reports on her visit to the Moving Image Archive in Scotland last week. 

The Moving Image Archive is Scotland’s national collection of moving image and is held at the National Library, part of Kelvin Hall in Glasgow. The archive, which is about to celebrate its 40th anniversary, is open to the public 5 days a week and is a free drop-in facility with no membership card required to access its archive material.

The material available spans Scottish life over the decades in both professional and amateur films, dating from as early as the turn of the 20th century to the late 1980’s, and the database is being added to all the time. You can watch over 1,900 clips and full-length films from the collection on the Moving Image Archive catalogue, and even more onsite at Kelvin Hall (some films aren’t available to view online due to data protection and copyright issues). You can view the full catalogue via various computers onsite, or watch highlights from the catalogue at a series of viewing stations.

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The onsite catalogue is identical to the online catalogue, the only difference being the amount of archive films available to view:  http://movingimage.nls.uk/ You can search the catalogue using a variety of methods, including searching for a year or type of film, or using keywords, the easiest of which initially could be place names. However, Learning and Outreach Officer Emily Munro also had interesting ideas of how to access the material housed in the archive creatively, including looking at themes that could pertain to a certain area through the Subject, Genre or Series search functions.

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For a group wanting to screen a film publicly, they would have to contact the Moving Image Archive in the first instance to see if they have a DVD copy of the film(s) available and who owns the copyright. If a DVD copy is unavailable, there will be a charge for having a DVD made, as well as a hire fee of £10 (& VAT) plus postage. The next step in exhibiting a chosen film would be to obtain the rights to screen it. If a third party owns the copyright, groups would have to contact this third party for permission to screen the film, which may be a broadcaster, corporation or individual. Often, third parties will not charge for exhibition rights, as long as the exhibitor is not charging an entrance fee or benefiting financially from the screening. There is also an additional charge payable to the Moving Image Archive for each public screening of one of the films in their catalogue. Here is a list of current MIA screening rates for exhibiting material from the archive to the public: http://www.nls.uk/media/1176687/2015-07-exhibitions-screenings-rates.pdf For participating Grow Your Own Cinema groups and other community cinema exhibitors, the rates would be as follows per screening: £8.33 for a film up to 15mins long, £12.50 for a film up to 30mins long, £16.66 for a film up to 60mins long and £20.83 for a film 60mins long or more (excluding VAT). As a result, you would probably be looking at around £25 per archive film screening.

It’s certainly worth having a dig around in the archive for ideas for archive films your audiences might like to see. Personally, I think this film is my new current favourite from the archive: http://movingimage.nls.uk/film/2405 It depicts a hen party in the late 80s in Glasgow and reflects a place and time at once very familiar whilst at the same time very much from another era, conjuring up a sense of happiness and sadness at its loss at the same time.

Find out more about the archive here: http://www.nls.uk/collections/moving-image-archive

Weekly Roundup Aug 29 – Sep 4

The weekly round up is a chance to catch up on all the things we’ve been talking about each week; be it opportunities, announcements or important and interesting news. Now you don’t have to miss out on anything and it’s all in one place!

This week:

  • We are delighted that film critic Ashley Clark will be joining us on the Friday night of the  2016 Community Cinema Conference to introduce the film he has selected and lead a discussion afterward! Ashley is a film critic, broadcast journalist and a film programmer. Ashley most recently programmed the BFI’s Black Star, the UK’s biggest ever season of film and television dedicated to celebrating the range, versatility and power of black actors. You can book your tickets for the 2016 Community Cinema Conference here.
  • Our lovely Technical Advice and Equipment Coordinator, Holly has written a great piece about why you should apply to the BFI Neighbourhood Cinema Equipment Fund. Read it here.
  • The Grow Your Own Cinema project have a lovely short video that shows you what the project is about and what they’ve been up to! Watch it here.
  • Cinema For All takes to the road again with the next set of Community Cinema Info Days! We’ll be visiting London, Leicester, Manchester and Bath. These events are free to attend and are for anyone who would like to start screening films in their community or groups that already do but would like to develop.

Weekly Roundup 22 – 28 August 2016

The weekly round up is a chance to catch up on all the things we’ve been talking about each week; be it opportunities, announcements or important and interesting news. Now you don’t have to miss out on anything and it’s all in one place!

This week:

  • The first screening as part of the Grow Your Own Cinema project has taken place at Letham Lights and it was a hit! Find out all about it here.
  • The early bird rate for passes for the 2016 Community Cinema Conference ends on 31 August! Be sure to grab yourself a saving and access to a brilliant weekend of film previews, panels, workshops, the Film Society of the Year awards, welcome night film + drinks and the awards party, including lunch on both days! Book your tickets here.
  • Cinema For All takes to the road again with the next set of Community Cinema Info Days! We’ll be visiting London, Leicester, Manchester and Bath. These events are free to attend and are for anyone who would like to start screening films in their community or groups that already do but would like to develop.
  • The BFI Neighbourhood Equipment Fund is open for applications until 26 September! Great opportunity to get your hands on some new screening equipment, with everything from projectors to chairs. More info here.

Grow Your Own Cinema Project – Letham Lights

Grow Your Own Cinema is an exciting new project by Cinema For All and Voluntary Arts Scotland set up to encourage voluntary arts groups to put on their very own film events. Read all about the first film screening as part of the project that took place at Letham  Lights!
New community cinema Letham Lights have grown out of existing voluntary arts group, Letham Nights as a result of the Grow Your Own Cinema project. Operating from Letham Village Hall, a dedicated group of local volunteers have been running gigs in rural Fife since 2008. After attending the Grow Your Own Cinema: Fife training day in Kirkcaldy in May, some of the group decided to diversify their activity and Letham Lights was formed. Their first screening was farming documentary Addicted To Sheep on Saturday 21 August, preceded by short films starring local children.
On the day of the event, the group set up a tuck shop selling sweetie bags, crisps and popcorn along with home baking, beer, wine and pimms at the back of the hall. Before the films, a slideshow of old images of Letham was played on screen interspersed with slides from classic movies like King Kong and Dr Strangelove. Classic cinema-style tickets were issued to the 50+ audience members and the group produced their own feedback forms about the film, complete with a colouring-in sheep design on the back in homage to the Addicted To Sheep feature. Prior to the screening, they played a ‘Pearl & Dean’ style trailer for upcoming Letham Lights attractions, as the group plan to screen Ghostbusters (1984) in October and It’s A Wonderful Life in December.
This event was also featured in the Fife Herald in the run-up to the screening.
The next screening in the Grow Your Own Cinema project will be The Jungle Book (2016) by the newly formed Kelty Community Cinema in association with the Moray Development Trust on Sunday 25 September. There are further screenings scheduled for October in Inverness, Wester Hailes, Thornhill, Farr, Fort William and Falkland.
Here is a short film detailing the work of the Grow Your Own Cinema project: