Tag Archives: A Hijacking

a hijacking

What’s your film of the year?

Relaunched last year the Film Society Film of the Year Award celebrates the most popular film among film society and community cinema audiences. Voted for by community exhibitors across the UK the award is presented at our annual Film Society of the Year Awards.

We invite all community exhibitors and their audience to nominate their favourite film from the 2013/14 season and the film with the most votes will be awarded the Film Society Film of the Year. The only restriction is that the film must have been shown at your community cinema after 1st September 2013. To register your vote click here.

This year’s ceremony will take place on the 27 September during the Cinema For All National Conference. To book your place check out our Eventbrite page here.

Last year Untouchable was the winner, after proving to be a huge hit with audiences up and down the country. The  multi award-winning French drama was based on the true story of Phillippe Pozzo di Borgi, a businessmen who was left severely paralysed after a para-gliding accident and who hires a young man from the projects to be his carer – against the advice of his family. The directors, Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache, sent in a lovely video message accepting the award and thanking community cinemas for supporting the film.


The last year has seen a tremendous number of great films screened across the community cinema sector and we can’t wait to find out which ones have been the favourites. To get you thinking about your favourite film we’ve selected several highlights below – but don’t forgot to tell us which was your Film Society Film of the Year!

A Hijacking | Tobias Lindholm | Denmark | 2012 | 99 mins

Arriving several months before Hollywood’s own piracy drama Captain Philips, A Hijacking is a perfectly crafted, achingly tense hostage thriller. When the crew of the MV Rosen are taken hostage by Somalian pirates the CEO of the shipping company lurches into a protracted and exasperating negotiation process. While he tries to resolve the situation the crew of the ship suffer in cramped and humid conditions with the threat of a violence constantly hanging over them.

No | Pablo Larrain | 2012 | Chile, France, USA | 118 mins

A Booking Scheme smash hit, No stars Gael Garcia Bernal in the final part of Pablo Larrain’s loose Pinochet trilogy. Bernal is Saavedra an advertising executive who is reluctantly convinced to take on the No campaign in the upcoming referendum on Pinochet’s continuing presidency. Though the election was widely viewed as a corrupt and empty show of the democratic process the No campaign very quickly picks up a startling level of support and the possibility of ending Pinochet’s dictatorship starts to seem within sight.

The Great Beauty | Paolo Sorrentino | 2013 | Italy, France | 135 mins

Winner of the Foreign Language at this year’s Oscar ceremony, Paolo Sorrentino’s latest film is a sumptuous and glorious achievement. Toni Servillo, Sorrentino’s regular collaborator stars as Jep Gambardella, a talented but lazy writer who after a phenomenal debut novel has neglected his art and set about dominating Rome’s decadent nightlife. On the cusp of his 65th birthday though he begins to take stock of his life and of his city.

Gloria | Sebastian Lelio | 2013 | Chile | 110 mins

Receiving a rapturous reception on the festival circuit, particularly for Paulina Garcia, the eponymous Gloria, Sebastian Lelio’s film is a triumphant celebration of the indefatigable Gloria. Divorced and with her grown up kids growing distant Gloria is determined not to remain alone and starts attending Santiago’s nightclubs. She soon meets a retired naval officer Rodolfo with whom she shares an immediate attraction. But Rodolfo’s own divorce has left him markedly less free-spirited than Gloria and their relationship starts to falter.

Gravity | Alfonso Cuaron | 2013 | USA, UK | 88 mins

Alfonso’s Cuaron’s space disaster was equally adored for its photo-real special effects which allowed for one of the most immersive space-set films ever, and it’s crucial central performance from Sandra Bullock. Eschewing the stereotype that films so reliant on special effects skimp on strong characters, Bullock’s Dr Stone is the perfect anchor around which the action circles. Kicking off with a jaw-dropping 20 minute take, Gravity starts with a routine spacewalk that turns into a desperate fight for survival when a satellite crash leaves Stone stranded in space.

Philomena | Stephen Frears | 2013 | UK, USA, France | 97 mins

Telling the true story of Philomena Lee and her 50 year search for the son that was forcibly adopted from her Philomena was one of the most successful British films this year. Judi Dench stars as Philomena whose son was given up for adoption by the convent that she went to to give birth. Working on her own Philomena spent nearly 50 years searching for her son until her daughter contacted the journalist Martin Sixsmith who agreed to help Philomena with the search. Their investigation takes them to America and where they encounter a series of dramatic revelations.

The Act of Killing | Joshua Oppenheimer | 2012 | Denmark, Norway, UK | 115/159 mins

 

A surreal, unforgettable documentary that gets at the very question of man’s capacity for evil, Oppenheimer’s extraordinary film raises pertinent and uncomfortable questions. When his attempts to document the stories of the survivors of the Indonesian genocide were thwarted by the government Oppenheimer turned the camera on the perpetrators themselves, many of whom remain in positions of power. Startlingly comfortable talking about the horrific actions they undertook Oppenheimer plays on their love of American movies and invites them to re-enact their actions in the style of their favourite films. In the process the killers inadvertently force themselves to see their actions from the viewpoint of their victims.

Like Father, Like Son | Hirokazu Kore-eda | 2013 | Japan | 121 mins

Two families are notified by the hospital that their children were accidentally swapped at birth, 6 years before. The hospital recommends they slowly reintroduce their son’s to their biological families. The fable-like set-up allows Kore-eda to contrast different styles of upbringing – Ryota is a wealthy but strict father while Yudai struggles to keep his shop open but keeps his large family constantly entertained. While the parents try to determine what the best outcome is the children get on with enjoying their new extended families. A rewarding and touching drama with a huge heart.

The Selfish Giant | Clio Barnard | 2013 | UK | 87 mins

Updating Oscar Wilde’s story to working class England, The Selfish Giant is a brilliant social-realist tale. Arbor and Swifty are two working class kids who are expelled from school after Arbor intercedes in a fight between Swifty and the school bullies. The expulsion gives them more times to pursue their hobby/job – stealing scrap metal to sell to the terrifying dealer Kitten, who inhabits a fenced off scrap heap. Kitten spies an opportunity to take advantage of the kids who are forced to rely on him for much needed cash.

Make your nomination for the Film Society Film of the Year Award here – and we hope to see you in Sheffield in September!

Like Father Like Son

New on the booking scheme

A slew off new releases from Peccadillo Pictures kicks off February and in the next few months we have a selection of new (And some familiar) titles from Arrow Films.

A Magnificent Haunting | Ferzan Ozpetek | 2012 | Italy | 105 mins
Available now

After the hugely popular Loose Cannons Ferzan Ozpetek returns with another spectacular comedy. A young aspiring actor, Pietro, moves to Rome in the hope of landing a starring role. He takes a job in a bakery to support himself while he tries for auditions and when he hears of a slightly run-down apartment going for cheap he snaps it up to escape his overprotective cousin. When he arrives he finds the previous tenant too scared to come inside to collect her things – and it quickly transpires that the flat is haunted. To Pietro’s delight however, the ghost are the members of a 1940s theatrical troupe who offer to help him coach him for a forthcoming audition if he will track down their missing member.

Kuma | Umat Dag | 2012 | Austria | 93 mins
Available now

Umat Dag, a Turkish-Austrian filmmaker, presents his debut feature – a precise and illuminating depiction of an unusual marriage. Ayse a 19 year old Turkish woman is chosen to be married to Hasan, the son of Fatma and Mustafa. However when Ayse arrives in Austria where Hasan’s family live it quickly becomes apparent that she is destined to be the second wife of Mustafa, given Fatma’s ailing health. Though manipulative, Fatma, is from a villain, dedicated as she is to ensuring her husband will be cared for after her passing, and Dag takes care to ensure the audience can understand each character’s motivations.

In the Name Of… | Malgorzata Szumowska | 2013 | Poland | 102 mins
Available now

A Catholic priest, Adam, is sent to help run a halfway house in rural Poland. He turned to religion fairly late, at 21, and it seems that he, like the boys in the retreat, is running away from something. The enforced isolation, though unexplained it is clear Adam does not wish to be here, causes him to harbour thoughts of temptation. Though Adam claims that his religion has been liberating for him, it is apparent that he is also refusing to acknowledge his desires. Winner of two awards at Berlinale 2013.

Any Day Now | Travis Fine | 2012 | USA | 98 mins
Available now

A dramatisation of the landmark 1970s court case in which a homosexual couple fought for adoption rights. Alan Cumming is Rudy Donatello, a musician and drag performer who is dating Paul Feiger (Garret Dillahunt), an assistant district attorney who has only come out to Rudy. Rudy’s neighbour, Marianne a drug addict with a disabled son, is busted for possession and her son, Marco is left uncared for. Distraught that Marco is being left to fend for himself Rudy takes him in and applies for custody of the child. However when his relationship with Paul becomes known the authorities take Marco away and Rudy convinces Paul to fight for the right for gay couples to adopt children for their neighbour’s disabled son after his mother was imprisoned. Both Dillahunt and Cumming give astounding performances in Fine’s impassioned drama.

I Wish | Hirokazu Koreeda | 2011 | Japan | 128 mins
Available now

Returning to the Booking Scheme this month I Wish has already proven a hit with community cinemas. A sweet family drama, I Wish focuses on two brothers who’ve parents have split up, Koichi lives with his mother while Ryu lives with his father. The arrangement is supposed to show that the split is temporary but as months go by it begins to seen more and more permanent. Joichi and Ryu dream of getting their family back together and over the phone they hatch a plan inspired by the rumour that if you make a wish at the precise point where two of Japan’s new bullet trains pass each other at top speed the incredible energy at that point will make it come true. The only problem is getting there…

A Hijacking | Tobias Lindholm | 2013 | Denmark | 103 mins
Screen from 1 May 2014

Another familiar film – A Hijacking will be rejoining the BFFS Booking Scheme this May! Tobias Lindholm’s masterful thriller has been justly praised for its spectacular direction, strong performances and unnerving tension. Lindholm, who wrote the Oscar nominated The Hunt, meticulously researched this dramatisation of the hijacking of a Dutch cargo ship off the coast of Somalia. The attention to detail heightens our immersion and the film is riveting and suspenseful. Split between the crew held hostage on the boat and the negotiations taking place from the shipping company headquarters, A Hijacking shows the extraordinary pressures on both sides of the crisis. Pilou Asbæek and Søren Malling, stars of Borgen and frequent collaborators with Lindholm, are exceptional as the ship’s cook and the company CEO who takes on the negotiations personally respectively.

Love Is All You Need | Susanne Bier | 2012 | Denmark, France, Italy, Sweden, Germany | 116 mins
Screen from 20 April 2014

Susanne Bier’s bittersweet romantic comedy makes the most of a catalogue of problems for her leads which makes their eventual meeting all the more rewarding. Ida (Trine Dyrholm), a hairdresser who’s undergoing chemotherapy (the original Danish title was a ‘The Bald Hairdresser’) finds her husband cheating on her shortly before they are due to fly out to their daughter’s wedding. Philip (Pierce Brosnan, expertly cast) a widower and a lemon seller is similarly frustrated by life and evidently Ida and Philip are fated to meet. What makes Love Is All You Need such a joy is the rich characters, the bitter humour and terrific chemistry. 

Looking for Hortense | Pascal Bonitzer | 2012 | France | 100 mins
Screen from 10 August 2014

A droll French comedy starring Kirsten Scott Thomas and Jean-Pierre Bacri. Damien and Iva, a well-to-do Parisian couple who are nevertheless bored with each other and both considering affairs. Iva however needs to keep Damien on side at least so she can use him to acquire work papers for her relative who’s being threatened with deportation. As ever Thomas gives a fantastic performance.

Like Father, Like Son | Hirokazu Koreeda | 2013 | Japan | 121 mins
Screen from 20 October 2014

Koreeda latest film concerns two Japanese families who learn that their 6 year old sons were accidentally swapped at birth after the hospital uncovers evidence of its mistake. The two families are encouraged to spend a  period of 12 months getting to know each other before swapping their sons back. The film focuses on one of the fathers, Ryota Nonomiya, a busy architect who has raised Keita to be a hardworking, disciplined and successful child. His biological son, Ryusei has been brought up in a larger, more laid back family; poorer but happier. Ryota and the other parents worry: which child has had the better upbringing? Which child should live where? Meanwhile the boys delight in exploring new homes and new surroundings. It’s a playful and delightful film,that toys with the ‘Nature vs. Nurture’ debate and explores how the familial bond is developed.

Looking further ahead; South Korean thriller The Taste of Money is available from 1 November 2014 and daring Danish comedy Klown is available from 7 December 2014.

a hijacking

Coming Soon – A Hijacking

Update: A Hijacking is available to book now to screen from 1st May 2014.

Tobias Lindholm’s nerve-shredding thriller is coming to the BFFS Booking Scheme this summer. Uncompromisingly realistic and directed with a masterful eye towards building tension A Hijacking is one of this year’s standout films.of the Danish cargo ship, MV Rosen, where half of the film’s narrative takes place, in favour of concentrating on what comes next: negotiation, uncertainty, fear and frustration. And it turns out that this is where the real drama lies.

A Hijacking

The film comes across as so grounded in reality, so accurate and detailed that it is easy to forget that you are watching a fictional film. Lindholm was inspired to make the film after learning about the hijacking of two Danish cargo ships in 2007 and 2008, but the film itself is not based on any particular case. It appears however to have been impeccably researched and filming took place on a ship that had been previously been hijacked, while real life negotiator Gary Skjoldmose Porter plays a version of himself.

The film’s narrative is split between events on the Rosen where Mikkel, the ship’s cook, (played by Borgen star Pilou Asbæk) as well as the other sailors wait in captivity with no idea how or when they are likely to be freed; and the offices of the shipping company where CEO Peter (played by Borgen’s other big star Søren Malling) leads negotiations with the pirates and struggles to cope with the pressure.

It is a film that concentrates more on emotional drama than action and there are no Hollywood inspired heroics that will save the day. Instead the audience is left in the unusual position of having no assurances as to how the situation is likely to unfold, and the unpredictability makes for engrossing viewing. With uniformly excellent performances across the board and a script that allows the characters to develop without overloading us on backstory, it can be hard to shake the feeling that you are watching real events unfold.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQ5b5Jml7H0]

A Hijacking is in cinemas now and will be available on the BFFS Booking Scheme from the end of August.